Tala Ko

Archive for September 2008

They’re just using small, four-foot-long helicopters now. But I smell a rogue robot helicopter movie on the horizon.
clipped from www.sciencedaily.com
Stanford computer scientists have developed an artificial intelligence system that enables robotic helicopters to teach themselves to fly difficult stunts by watching other helicopters perform the same maneuvers.
The stunts are “by far the most difficult aerobatic maneuvers flown by any computer controlled helicopter,”
The dazzling airshow is an important demonstration of “apprenticeship learning,” in which robots learn by observing an expert, rather than by having software engineers peck away at their keyboards in an attempt to write instructions from scratch.
Stanford’s artificial intelligence system learned how to fly by “watching” the four-foot-long helicopters flown by expert radio control pilot Garett Oku. “Garett can pick up any helicopter, even ones he’s never seen, and go fly amazing aerobatics. So the question for us is always, why can’t computers do things like this?” Coates said.
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I could cry.
clipped from newsinfo.inquirer.net
MANILA, Philippines—An environmentalist group Sunday condemned the “gruesome slaughter” of age-old trees in a plaza fronting the Manila Cathedral in Intramuros, Manila, a week before the celebration of Creation Month which starts Monday.
Ecowaste Coalition said 29 healthy narra, mahogany, mango, neem, fire and Indian trees in Plaza Roma were cut down last Monday in violation of the cutting and balling permit issued by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.
The DENR issued a permit to the Intramuros Administration on Aug. 5 to make way for the latter’s plan to re-landscape Plaza Roma.
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Fly-dey senses.
clipped from www.sciencedaily.com
Using high-resolution, high-speed digital imaging of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) faced with a looming swatter, Dickinson and graduate student Gwyneth Card have determined the secret to a fly’s evasive maneuvering. Long before the fly leaps, its tiny brain calculates the location of the impending threat, comes up with an escape plan, and places its legs in an optimal position to hop out of the way in the opposite direction. All of this action takes place within about 100 milliseconds after the fly first spots the swatter.
“It is best not to swat at the fly’s starting position, but rather to aim a bit forward of that to anticipate where the fly is going to jump when it first sees your swatter,”
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