Tala Ko

Archive for April 2009

Man floating in space is awesome.
clipped from jstn.cc

Bruce McCandless II performing the first untethered spacewalk in 1984.  In this picture he’s 100 meters away from the shuttle, orbiting the Earth at a likely velocity of 7.7 km/s, with nothing but a jet pack to get back on board.
Bruce McCandless II performing the first untethered spacewalk in 1984. In this picture he’s 100 meters away from the shuttle, orbiting the Earth at a likely velocity of 7.7 km/s, with nothing but a jet pack to get back on board.
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clipped from www.grahamhancock.com

The city of Venice has announced a plan to utilize algae in a different way than we’re used to hearing about. The Italian city plans to produce 50 percent of its electricity needs from an algae-based power plant instead of fossil fuels.

The water-filled city is turning what has become a nuisance into a renewable energy resource. The city will be producing electricity from two types of algae that are brought in clinging to ships and regularly grow over the seaport. The algae will be cultivated and treated in laboratories to turn it into fuel. The fuel will then be used to power turbines in a new 40 MW power plant in the center of the city.

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On a related note, people against gay marriage say that it’s going to destroy the family. What to think of a pair of same-sex creatures getting married after proving they were the best parents in the zoo?
clipped from www.thesun.co.uk

Cute ... penguins

They were once given the cold shoulder at the wildlife park in China for
stealing heterosexual couples’ eggs to nest as their own.


But after being allowed to try out with eggs rejected by their mothers the
couple have become the zoo’s best penguin parents.


Now keepers at Polarland Zoo in Harbin, north east China, have rewarded their
devotion with a wedding day.

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clipped from www.tweenbots.com
we are very occupied with getting from one place to another. I wondered: could a human-like object traverse sidewalks and streets along with us, and in so doing, create a narrative about our relationship to space and our willingness to interact with what we find in it?
To answer these questions, I built robots.
Tweenbots are human-dependent robots that navigate the city with the help of pedestrians they encounter. Rolling at a constant speed, in a straight line, Tweenbots have a destination displayed on a flag, and rely on people they meet to read this flag and to aim them in the right direction to reach their goal.

Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
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