Tala Ko

Posts Tagged ‘learning

Messing with your body clock may have bad effects on learning and retention. (I’m looking at you, Gella and Mikko.)
clipped from www.sciencedaily.com
The circadian rhythm that quietly pulses inside us all, guiding our daily cycle from sleep to wakefulness and back to sleep again, may be doing much more
hamsters whose circadian system was disabled by a new technique Ruby and his colleagues developed consistently failed to demonstrate the same evidence of remembering their environment as hamsters with normally functioning circadian systems.
hinge on the amount of a neurochemical called GABA, which acts to inhibit brain activity
circadian clock controls the daily cycle of sleep and wakefulness by inhibiting different parts of the brain by releasing GABA
if the hippocampus – the part of the brain where memories are stored – is overly inhibited, then the circuits responsible for memory storage don’t function properly
performed terribly on a simple learning task, even though they’re getting loads of sleep
circadian system really is necessary for something that is deeply important: learning
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Well, MS can’t be all bad, can it?
clipped from newsinfo.inquirer.net
The laboratory is using Microsoft Vista, but Dunleavy promised the school that when he visits the village again next year, he would bring along a Microsoft Version 7
What was then a small school in a depressed village began to change
He gave us fund for school supplies, school uniforms and for the contributions so that the parents won’t be spending anymore
Dunleavy provided 160 scholarship grants, but this has now increased to 200. He extended the program to high school students
also provided financial support to address the malnutrition problem in Gadgaran.
the school’s dropout rate went down to zero, the academic performance of the pupils greatly improved, and there were no cutting of classes and unnecessary absences among the pupils
for every amount that Dunleavy donates, Microsoft, as a policy to its donor employees, matches this.
Mathematics, Science, Arts, and Entertainment and Communications sections, which were all painted in
the four colors of the Microsoft logo.
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They’re just using small, four-foot-long helicopters now. But I smell a rogue robot helicopter movie on the horizon.
clipped from www.sciencedaily.com
Stanford computer scientists have developed an artificial intelligence system that enables robotic helicopters to teach themselves to fly difficult stunts by watching other helicopters perform the same maneuvers.
The stunts are “by far the most difficult aerobatic maneuvers flown by any computer controlled helicopter,”
The dazzling airshow is an important demonstration of “apprenticeship learning,” in which robots learn by observing an expert, rather than by having software engineers peck away at their keyboards in an attempt to write instructions from scratch.
Stanford’s artificial intelligence system learned how to fly by “watching” the four-foot-long helicopters flown by expert radio control pilot Garett Oku. “Garett can pick up any helicopter, even ones he’s never seen, and go fly amazing aerobatics. So the question for us is always, why can’t computers do things like this?” Coates said.
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