Tala Ko

Posts Tagged ‘women

clipped from www.guardian.co.uk

Fertile women raise their voice pitch

woman singing
Women’s voices rise and fall in tune with their fertility, according to research by psychologists.
Recordings of women taken at different times in their monthly cycle show that the female voice rises perceptibly a day or two before ovulation, when women are most likely to become pregnant.
The findings are the first to point to a link between voice and fertility and build on recent studies which support the idea that humans may be similar to other animals in displaying outward signs of fertility.
Two years ago, Haselton published another study into female fertility and the monthly cycle, which suggested that women “dressed to impress” when at their most fertile, favouring skirts over trousers and showing more skin.
The work goes against the long-held belief that humans, unlike many other
animals, hide any evidence of ovulation.
Last year, scientists
claimed that women sway their hips more when they are at their most fertile.
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So, society – specifically, a perceived lack of support from parents and teachers – is to blame. That doesn’t surprise me, but the study and its results do add fuel to the fire.
clipped from www.sciencedaily.com
New research by a team that includes vocational psychologists at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) indicates that the self-confidence instilled by parents and teachers is more important for young girls learning math and science than their initial interest.
more attention should be given to building confidence in their abilities early in their education
Many young students, particularly girls, see math and science as difficult, and don’t take any more classes than they have to, not realizing they are cutting themselves off from lucrative opportunities in college and careers.
Both boys and girls perceived that teachers thought boys were stronger at math and science. For boys this represented a support, while for girls it acted as a barrier.
it’s perception, more than reality, that affects the person’s academic and career choice
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